ARMATURE ANIMATION

ARMATURE ANIMATION 03 Blender EN
AYANA
AYANA

Hello everyone!

I’m Ayana, a Vtuber!

Today, I will explain how to create armature animation

AYANA
AYANA

Let’s begin!

Let’s start!

【No.10-05】【Blender】[Beginner] ARMATURE ANIMATION

By inserting keyframes while transforming the armature, you can create an animation that adds movement to the character. This time, I will show you how to make a walking robot.

Transform armature

First, I will explain how to set the walking motion for the robot.

 Click Pause Mode from the menu at the top left of the 3D viewport.

Press A to select all bones and click “Clear Transform”-> “All” from “Pause” in the header of the 3D viewport. This will return the model to its initial pose.

Next, operate each bone to set the walking motion. You can rotate the bone in any direction by clicking the “Rotate” gizmo on the toolbar. At this time, select “Local” from the “Transformation Orientation” menu in the header of the 3D viewport to make the operation easier.

Let’s pose the robot like this. Put the right foot forward, set left foot to the back, the left arm to the front, and the right arm to the back.

Adjust the position of the model itself to match the ground. To move the model itself, click the “Move” gizmo on the toolbar and operate the waist bone.

After completing the bone operation,let’s set the keyframe. I will place the keyframe at frame 1 and frame 32

With all bones selected, select “Animation”-> “Insert Keyframe” from “Pause” in the header of the 3D viewport, and click “Location / Rotation” from the “Insert Keyframe Menu”.

Next, Moves to frame 32. Select “Animation”-> “Insert Keyframe” from “Pause”, and click “Position / Rotate” from the “Insert Keyframe Menu”.

To invert the pose, move the current frame to frame 16, and with all bones selected, click “Copy Pose” from “Pose” in the header of the 3D viewport.

Then, from Pose in the header of the 3D viewport, click Paste Pose Flipped

After reversing the pose, select “Animation”-> “Insert Keyframe” from “Pose”, and click “Position / Rotate” from the “Keyframe Insert Menu”.

If you click the “Play Button” in the header of the timeline in this state, the walking animation will be like this. Although it works roughly, it still feels a little strange, such as the body of the robot not moving up and down at all. Therefore, we need to set more keyframes to adjust the motion.

Next, move to frame 8. Straighten the robot’s right foot and bend the knees to straighten each bone so that your left foot is off the ground. At the same time as fixing the foot, the position of the model itself is adjusted to the ground.

Switch the viewpoint to the front. The center of gravity is on your right foot, so tilt your upper body slightly to the right.

With all bones selected, select “Animation”-> “Insert Keyframe” from “Pause” in the header of the 3D viewport, and click “Position / Rotate” from the “Keyframe Insert Menu”.

Invert the pose as before. With all bones selected, click “Copy Pose” from “Pose” in the header of the 3D viewport.

Move to frame 24 and click “Paste Pose Flipped” from “Pose” in the header of the 3D viewport.

Select “Animation”-> “Insert Keyframe” from “Pose” in the header of the 3D viewport, and click “Location / Rotation” from the “Keyframe Insert Menu”.

Now press the play button and watch the movement. We can see the walking movement is more realistic like this.

Armature movement

Next, I will explain how to combine the created walking animation with the movement of the armature.

Move with path animation

Here, we will explain how to move an armature using path animation.

First of all, the walking animation time is too short at present, so increase the number of frames. Set “End” in the header of the timeline to “125”.

Duplicates already inserted keyframes to match the increased number of frames. Press A on the timeline to select all keyframes and Shift + D to duplicate the selected keyframes. At this time, I will place it overlap with frame 32 position, and left-click to determine the duplication position.

Repeat the same operation tuntil the end of frame 125.

Next, create the path to use for path animation. In object mode, click “Curve”-> “Path” from “Add” in the header of the 3D viewport.

Switch to edit mode and change the length of the added path.

After deciding the length of the path, switch to object mode. Select Armature and Curved Objects and click “Object” → “Parent” → “Follow Path”

Select the curve object to switch to edit mode. Select the starting point of the path and click Snap> Cursor> Selection from Curve in the header of the 3D viewport. This will move the 3D cursor to the starting point.

Switch to object mode and select the armature. Click “Snap”-> “Selection to Cursor” from “Object” in the header of the 3D viewport. The object then moves to the position of the 3D cursor, the starting point of the path.

Adjust the direction of the armature according to the direction of travel of the path.

With the curve object selected, open the Path Animation panel from Object Data Properties. Set “Frame” to “125” according to the number of frames of the walking animation.

After completing the above operations, click the “Play Button” in the header of the timeline to check the preview. At this time, if the movement speed is too fast or too slow compared to the walking motion, adjust the length of the path to correct the speed.

Use bones for movement

Next, I will explain how to move an armature using a moving bone.

The same with the path animation, set the number of frames to “125” and duplicate the keyframes accordingly.

Select the armature in object mode and switch to edit mode. Click Add> Single Bone

Move the added bone down like this

Click “Bone Properties” and rename the added bone to “root”.

Select the hip bone and select “root” from “Parent” in the Relations panel. As a result, the waist bone and “root” are in a parent-child relationship, and both bones are connected by a dotted line.

Now switch to pause mode. After confirming that the current frame is “1” on the timeline, select “root” bone and select “Pause” in the header of the 3D viewport, then “Animation” → “Insert keyframe”. Select “” and click “Position / Rotate” from the “Keyframe Insertion Menu”.

Move to frame 125 and move the “root” bone to any position in front of the model.

After deciding the position, select “Animation”-> “Insert Keyframe” from “Pause” in the header of the 3D viewport, and click “Position” from the “Keyframe Insert Menu”.

This completes the insertion of the keyframe, but since the movement speed is not constant in this state, edit the movement speed from the graph editor. With the “root” bone selected, click Graph Editor from the Editor Type menu

Click the triangle on the left to see all channels. If you click “Z location (root)”, only the curve for which the change is set will be selected. In this state, you can make the movement speed constant by clicking “Interpolation mode”-> “Linear” from “Key” in the header of the graph editor.

After completing the above operations, switch the screen from the graph editor to the 3D viewport and check the preview from the “Play button” in the header of the timeline. If the movement speed is too fast or too slow compared to the walking motion, adjust the position of the “root” bone in frame 125 to correct the speed.

At this time, if you click “Auto Keying” in the header of the timeline to enable it, the keyframe will be inserted automatically every time you change the bone of “root”

 In this way, we were able to create a walking animation similar to when using the path animation.

This is the end of the lecture how to create armature animation!

AYANA
AYANA

How is everyone doing?

Did you understand today’s lecture?

See you again for the next lecture!

See you soon! Bye-bye!

コメント

タイトルとURLをコピーしました